Up In Blue

Help me, help you, to help everyone, so we can understand each other and this world a little better

1. Use the time of a total stranger in such a way that he or she will not feel the time was wasted.

2. Give the reader at least one character he or she can root for.

3. Every character should want something, even if it is only a glass of water.

4. Every sentence must do one o ftwo things-reveal character or advance the action.

5. Start as close to the end as possible.

6. Be a sadist. No matter how sweet and innocent your leading characters, make awful things happen to them-in order that the reader may see what they are made of.

7. Write to please just one person. If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia.

8. Give your readers as much information as possible as soon as possible. To heck with suspense. Readers should have such complete understanding of what is going on, where and why, that they could finish the story themselves, should cockroaches eat the last few pages.

—   "Creative Writing 101" by Kurt Vonnegut (via electric-sympathy)

(Source: sheilashankly, via electric-sympathy)

universalequalityisinevitable:

By definition, the kind of world I want cannot be bought.

(via universalequalityisinevitable)

universalequalityisinevitable:

Considering that everything within the free market system has a price and that prices within this system can range from as little as a fraction of a penny to as much as the Earth’s finite future capacity to naturally sustain the survival of both humans and non-humans alike, the only aspect of the free market that’s actually “free” is the extent to which top dogs within the system have freedom from accountability—in other words the freedom to profitably ignore reality and to externalize the side effects of their ignorance, thus further maximizing their profit margins (which is both intrinsically unsustainable and one of the primary reasons every product or service within the free market inherently comes with a price).

But as Ayn Rand, one of the 20th century’s most prominent advocates of laissez-faire capitalism, once said: “You can ignore reality, but you cannot ignore the consequences of ignoring reality.”

(via universalequalityisinevitable)

“The paradox seems to be, as Socrates demonstrated long ago, the truly free individual is free only to the extent of his own self-mastery. While those who will not govern themselves are condemned to find masters to govern over them.”

—   

Steven Pressfield, The War of Art (via lordchuckle)

Yes!

(via dialectic)

(via thedrunkanarchist-deactivated20)

Download books

fuckyeahexistentialism:

classic literature:

  1. 1984 by George Orwell
  2. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
  3. A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
  4. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  5. Aesop’s Fables by Aesop
  6. Agnes Grey by Anne Brontë
  7. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Caroll
  8. Andersen’s Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen
  9. Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
  10. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  11. Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
  12. Beyond Good and Evil by Friedrich Nietzsche
  13. Bleak House by Charles Dickens
  14. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  15. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  16. Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell
  17. Dracula by Bram Stoker
  18. Dubliners by James Joyce
  19. Emma by Jane Austen
  20. Erewhon by Samuel Butler
  21. For the Term of His Natural Life by Marcus Clarke
  22. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  23. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  24. Grimms Fairy Tales by the brothers Grimm
  25. Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift
  26. Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  27. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  28. Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson
  29. Lady Chatterly’s Lover by D. H. Lawrence
  30. Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
  31. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  32. Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
  33. Middlemarch by George Eliot
  34. Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  35. Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
  36. Nostromo: A Tale of the Seaboard by Joseph Conrad
  37. Notes from the Underground by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  38. Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham
  39. Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
  40. Paradise Lost by John Milton
  41. Persuasion by Jane Austen
  42. Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter
  43. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  44. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
  45. Sense and Sensibility, by Jane Austen
  46. Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence
  47. Swanns Way by Marcel Proust
  48. Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs
  49. Tender is the Night by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  50. Tess of the d’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
  51. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
  52. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
  53. The Brothers Karamazov, by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  54. The Great Gatsby
  55. The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle
  56. The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  57. The Iliad by Homer
  58. The Island of Doctor Moreau by H. G. Wells
  59. The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
  60. The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
  61. The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving
  62. The Odyssey by Homer
  63. The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle
  64. The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
  65. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
  66. The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James
  67. The Prince by Nicolo Machiavelli
  68. The Scarlet Pimpernel by Baroness Orczy
  69. The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
  70. The Tales of Mother Goose by Charles Perrault
  71. The Thirty Nine Steps by John Buchan
  72. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Duma
  73. The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
  74. The Trial by Franz Kafka
  75. The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells
  76. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
  77. Ulysses by James Joyce
  78. Utopia by Sir Thomas More
  79. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
  80. Within A Budding Grove by Marcel Proust
  81. Women In Love by D. H. Lawrence
  82. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë

modern literature:

  1. A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess
  2. A Study In Scarlet - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  3. Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter - Seth Grahame-Smith
  4. An Abundance of Katherines - John Green
  5. Artemis Fowl - Eoin Colfer
  6. Bossypants - Tina Fey
  7. Breakfast At Tiffany’s - Truman Capote
  8. Bridget Jones’s Diary - Helen Fielding
  9. Catcher In The Rye - J.D. Salinger
  10. Charlie And The Chocolate Factory - Roald Dahl
  11. City of Bones - Cassandra Clare
  12. Clockwork Angel - Cassandra Clare
  13. Damned - Chuck Palahniuk
  14. Darkly Dreaming Dexter - Jeff Lindsay
  15. Dead Until Dark - Charlaine Harris
  16. Ender’s Game - Orson Scott Card
  17. Everything Is Illuminated - Jonathan Safran Foer
  18. Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close - Jonathan Safran Foer
  19. Fahrenheit 451 - Ray Bradbury
  20. Fight Club - Chuck Palahniuk
  21. Go The Fuck To Sleep - Adam Mansbach
  22. I Am America (And So Can You!) - Stephen Colbert
  23. I Am Number Four - Pittacus Lore
  24. Inkheart - Cornelia Funke
  25. It - Stephen King
  26. Life of Pi - Yann Martel
  27. Lolita - Vladmir Nabokov
  28. Marked - Kristin Cast
  29. Memoirs Of A Geisha - Arthur Golden
  30. My Sister’s Keeper - Jodi Picoult
  31. Never Let Me Go - Kazuo Ishiguro
  32. One Day - David Nicholls
  33. Paper Towns - John Green
  34. Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightening Thief - Rick Riordan
  35. Pretty Little Liars - Sara Shepard
  36. Slaughterhouse Five - Kurt Vonnegut
  37. Snow White And The Huntsman - Lily Blake
  38. The Book Thief - Markus Zusak
  39. The Bourne Identity - Robert Ludlum
  40. The Giver - Lois Lowry
  41. The Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins
  42. The Kite Runner - Khaled Hosseini
  43. The Lovely Bones - Alice Sebold
  44. The Notebook - Nicholas Sparks
  45. The Outsiders - S.E. Hinton
  46. The Perks of Being A Wallflower - Stephen Chbosky
  47. The Princess Diaries - Meg Cabot
  48. The Things They Carried - Tim O’Brien
  49. The Time Traveler’s Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
  50. The Ultimate Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy - Douglas Adams
  51. Tuesdays With Morrie - Mitch Albom
  52. Uglies - Scott Westerfeld
  53. Vampire Diaries: The Awakening - L.J. Smith
  54. Water For Elephants - Sara Gruen
  55. Wicked - Gregory Maguire

(Source: nachosauruz)

(via catesstrophe)

fuckyeahphilochs:

"The other night, a voice came to me. Turned out it was God. He said, ‘Oops, wake up, this is God here, over.’ I said, ‘You’re putting me on, of course, Dylan.’ So he did a few tricks, moved the bed back and forth… Trembling, I asked, ‘What is it you want, O Lord?’ He said, ‘Well, frankly Phil, I went downtown the other day, saw the greatest story ever told— Couldn’t believe it! It’s gone too far; something must be done about Christianity. Then woof, in a puff of smoke, he disappeared. The next morning, I woke up, had a few drinks, to realized [sic] it was all true, and decided to do something about Christianity. But what could I do, me, a poor, humble boy from the [States/Styx]? Then I remembered I was a songwriter—Aha!—So I sat down with pen in hand, over my typewriter, and ended up writing this next song, which is a hymn about Christianity—Actually an anti-hymn, the first anti-hymn, folks!"

(via beneta)

beneta:

Thank you all right we been here for twelve nights I think, and different people have been stopping down. I wanna thank them all. Jerry Garcia was here, lets see, Elton John, Bruce Springsteen, Captain Beefheart. They all went through here one time or another. Anyway got another special guest tonight. Can’t get away we know so many people you know. Anyway I first met this next man I think about, almost twenty years ago if not that. Probably was, and he was playing in a group, I don’t remember the name of the group actually. But he went on and started a group called The Byrds, I’m sure you heard of them. Anyway we’ve played together before, been on tours together and all that kind of stuff. I’ll bring him out here now, you know who he is, Roger McGuinn.

 

Oh, there’s a fellow up there looking for the savior. Savior’s backstage, we got a picture of him.

(Source: beneta)

if you’re following me tonight since I’m posting a lot of Bob Dylan, know this is a one night thing. I just want to see how many notes I can get.